Volume 44, 2018

Issue 2, May 2018

SUPPRESSION OF HETERODERA SACCHARI IN RICE WITH AGRICULTURAL WASTE-SILVER NANO PARTICLES

O. A. Fabiyi1, G. A. Olatunji2, A. O. Saadu1

1Department of Crop Protection, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
2Department of Industrial Chemistry, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria

 

ABSTRACT

Pests bring about significant decrease in rice production which translates to huge financial loss. Plant parasitic nematodes are economically important pests of rice. Three different agro-silver nano particles were synthesized using conventional methods with agricultural wastes: corncobs, milled maize residue also referred to as ogi residue and rice husk. The supernatant liquid was decanted and the residue was air dried at room temperature. This was incorporated into the soil of rice (NERICA 1 variety) plants inoculated with cyst nematodes Heterodera sacchari. The application of silver nano particles at 75g and 50g increased the vegetative growth and robustness of rice plants with comparatively higher yield than the yield obtained from untreated plants as demonstrated in pot experiments. Thus agro-wastes silver nano particle (AgNP) can be employed in the control of nematode pests of rice. The adoption of the agro-based nano particle by rural farmers is technically feasible.

Keywords: Cyst nematodes, pollution, bio-pesticide, nematicides, nano-particles

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DESORPTION BEHAVIOUR OF PB AND ZN FROM
STABILIZED ISF SLAG IN BITUMINOUS MIXES

Dr. S. B. Patil1, Dr. A. K. Vyas2, Dr. A. B. Gupta2, Dr. R. K. Vyas3,
Rajesh Bansal4, Rashmi S. Patil5

1,2Department of Civil Engineering
3Department of Chemical Engineering
1Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Technological University, Lonere – 402 103, INDIA

2,3Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur – 302 017, INDIA

4Hindustan Zinc Ltd., Chanderiya, Chittorgarh, Rajasthan, INDIA

5M. Tech Student, PDA College of Engineering Gulbarga, INDIA

 

ABSTRACT

Imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag from Zinc industries is a waste byproduct produced in a large quantity in pyrometallurgical process. This slag is considered hazardous. An attempt has been made to replace fine aggregate by ISF slag in bituminous mixes. Solidification and Stabilization (S/S) technique was adopted in the present study to immobilize metals, e.g. Pb and Zn with fine aggregate in Bituminous Concrete (BC) and Dense Bituminous Macadam (DBM) mixes. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) tests indicate that solidified mixes are environmentally acceptable. Linear, Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin Isotherms have been drawn for release of Pb and Zn from BC and DBM mixes using buffer solution in TCLP test. Tempkin and Freundlich isotherms were found to be the best-fit Isotherm for release of Pb and Zn, respectively.

Keywords: Desorption, Slag, Bituminous mixes, Isotherm, TCLP, Hazardous waste

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LFG EMISSION AND CH4 OXIDATION MEASUREMENTS IN A TROPICAL CLIMATE: SPATIAL AND SEASONAL VARIATIONS

Mohammed F. M. Abushammala1*, Mohammad K. Younes2

1Department of Civil Engineering, Middle East College, Knowledge Oasis Muscat, P.B. No 79, Al Rusayl, Postal Code: 124, Sultanate of Oman
2Department of Civil Engineering, Philadelphia University, P.O. Box 19392, Amman, Jordan

eng_abushammala@yahoo.com

 

ABSTRACT

Landfill gas (LFG) emissions and methane (CH4) oxidation were investigated in a landfill located in tropical climate in Malaysia to measure spatial and seasonal variations in CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, the capacity of CH4 oxidation in the landfill cover soil, seasonal variation of CH4 oxidation, and the impact of CH4 oxidation on composition of LFG emissions. The measurements were conducted within eight months during the rainy and dry seasons. CH4 and CO2 emissions were measured using a fabricated static flux chamber. The averages of CH4 and CO2 emissions were determined using the geospatial average (g/m2/d) with lesser error. The combination of the gas concentrations (CH4 and CO2) below the cover soil and the surface CH4 and CO2 fluxes at four stations were utilized to determine the average CH4 oxidation capacity (%). The results of the study showed that CH4 and CO2 emissions were not spatially uniform and ranged from 0 to 1,602 g/m2/d and 5 to 2,753 gm-2 d-1 in both seasons. In addition, higher CH4 and CO2 emissions and lower CH4 oxidation capacity were observed in the rainy season in contrast to the dry season.

Keywords: CH4 oxidation, landfill cover soils, LFG emission, seasonal variation, spatial variation, methane oxidation

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HYDROMETALLURGICAL REMOVAL OF COBALT, MOLYBDENUM, AND NICKEL FROM SOLID WASTE SPENT HYDROPROCESSING CATALYSTS

S. Shafiei Zadeh1, P. E. Georghiou2, H. Hassan Nejad3

1M.Sc. Student, Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science,
Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, A1B 5S7

2Professor, Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland,
St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, A1B 3X7

3Ph.D. Candidate, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Memorial University of Newfoundland,
St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada, A1B 3X5

 

ABSTRACT

A process is described for the use of extractants for the removal of hazardous metals from leachates obtained from treating spent hydroprocessing catalysts with different acidic solutions. The extractants tested were toluene solutions of either Aliquat336, Alamine308, or Alamine336. The concentration of extractants, stirring time, and organic/aqueous ratio were considered as the most significant parameters. Alamine308 was selected as the most efficient extractant due to its capability to remove nickel, molybdenum, and cobalt completely in only 10 minutes with diluted solutions. Statistical modeling was also conducted using the central composite design (CCD) in Design Expert® software and ANOVA results are presented.

Keywords: Hydroprocessing catalysts, Hydrometallurgy, Solvent Extraction, Hazardous metals

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REQUIREMENT OF PRE-PROCESSING IN A WASTE TO ENERGY (WTE) PLANT BASED ON INDIAN MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW)

G. P. Misra1*, P. Kaushal2, A. K. Bhaskarwar3, P. D. Grover3

1Teri University, New Delhi, India
2Assistant Professor of Energy & Environment Dept, Teri University, New Delhi, India
3Professor Department of Chemical Engg, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India
4Ex Professor Department of Chemical Engg, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India

gyan.misra1@gmail.com
0091 9871846107

ABSTRACT

Globally, mass incineration is the most commonly used waste-to-energy (WtE) technology for processing of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW). In such plants, the MSW, as received, is kept in a bunker for approximately 7 days for reduction of moisture, and homogenization. The waste is then subjected to controlled combustion in a mass-burn incinerator for the production of heat or electricity. However, in developing countries like India, characteristics of waste are substantially different from those in developed countries. Most projects based on incineration technologies in India have failed and been forced to shut down. The problems encountered with these plants, include low calorific value of MSW, inefficient combustion of waste and environmental pollution concerns. These problems have been attributed to poor source segregation of waste, high moisture content, and mixing of construction and demolition debris, road sweepings, and drain silt in MSW amongst various other reasons. The combination of these problems have made the combustion of raw MSW (mass incineration) challenging. Therefore, this paper recommends that mixed MSW in countries like India should be subjected to extensive mechanical pre-processing, so that the organically rich fraction, combustible fraction and inert materials can be separated. The materials derived through this process (refuse derived fuel or combustibles) have a higher calorific value, high volatile matter, a higher combustion rate, and a lower moisture content as compared with mixed waste. All of these factors aid in more efficient burning, lower environmental pollution and a higher yield per unit. The inert materials left over as a result of this process can be disposed in sanitary landfills, and the organically rich fraction can be used to generate compost or biogas.

Keywords: Solid Waste Management in India, Waste-to-Energy (WtE), Mass Incineration, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) Combustion, Pre-processing of mixed MSW

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ORGANIC MICROPOLLUTANT ADSORPTION IN CHEMICALLY MODIFIED FORESTRY PINUS ELLIOTTI SPP BARKS

Thiago Caique Alvesa, Adílson Pinheiroa, Daniel Schwantesb e Affonso Celso Gonçalves Jr.b

aFundação Universidade Regional de Blumenau
bUniversidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná

thiago.caique@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT

Anthropogenic activities generate waste products, which consist of an emerging and troubling class of organic micropollutants (OMPs). These contaminants can damage human and environmental health, being present in hospitals and agricultural wastewater, with the aggravating factor of not being effectively removed in treatment plants. Of the available waste treatment technologies, adsorption appears to be the most promising, because it does not promote the formation of degradation by-products, which may exhibit a similar, or even greater, hazard to primary compounds. In this context, the present study assessed the adsorption potential of seven hormones (natural and synthetic) using two adsorbents prepared from Pinus eliotti spp. barks. An activated carbon commonly used in treatment plants was used as a control. The adsorption experiments were carried out with spiked samples at a 1 mg L-1 contaminant concentration, at doses of adsorbent material that are capable of removing 80% of the concentration of contaminants (D80). The materials were prepared by acidic or basic hydrolysis, being characterized by the addition of pine sulphur (PS) and potassium to their surfaces. The analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection. The possibility that the effect of electronegativity of the medium would interfere in the removal of the hormones was also evaluated. A comparison of the three materials showed that the activated carbon provided the most favourable outcome. However, it was found that the material containing sulphur was 58.4% less effective than the commercial material. The materials, particularly the PS, can be used to remove OMPs; however, improvements must be made. The relationships between adsorption and the characteristics of adsorbents and interferents should also be evaluated.

Keywords: Wastewater treatment, natural adsorbent, micropollutant treatment

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ANAEROBIC CO–DIGESTION OF ORGANIC WASTE: INFLUENCES PARTICLE SIZE AND CONCENTRATION TOTAL SOLIDS

Valderi Duarte Leite*, Crislânne Lemos Viriato, José Tavares de Sousa,
Wilton Silva Lopes, Elaine Gurjão de Oliveira

Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering, University of Paraiba State,
Campina Grande, Paraíba, Brazil

mangabeiraleite@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

In this investigation we studied the influence of particle size and concentration of total solids in the process of anaerobic co-digestion of vegetable solid waste with anaerobic sludge of sanitary sewage, in the proportion of 80 and 20% (weight percent) respectively. The experimental system consisted of nine batch anaerobic reactors with unit volume capacity of two liters. The particle sizes of the waste investigated were 1.68, 2.00, 3.36 mm and total solids concentration of 30.0, 40.0 and 50.5 gTS.L-1 with an experimental design consisting of three different treatments and three repetitions and 200-day monitoring period. The most representative efficiency of transformation of carbonaceous and nitrogenous material was observed in the treatment with substrate with particle size of 1.68 and concentration of total solids of 30.0 gTS.L-1. Therefore, it was evidenced that the biogas production rate was inversely proportional to the particle size and the concentration of total solids of the substrate when submitted to the anaerobic co-digestion process.

Keywords: anaerobic; vegetable solid waste; anaerobic sludge; biogas production

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SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN NIGERIA:  PROBLEMS, PROSPECTS, AND POLICIES

C. C. Ike1, C. C. Ezeibe1, S. C. Anijiofor2,3*, N. N. Nik Daud2

1Department of Political Science, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu State, Nigeria

2Civil Engineering Department, Universiti Putra, Malaysia, Selangor Malaysia

3Civil Engineering Department, Federal Polytechnic, Birnin Kebbi, Kebbi State, Nigeria

sandee4jesus@yahoo.com
+2348036209233, +60172772335

ABSTRACT

Solid waste management is a major environmental challenge in most Nigerian cities. Waste generation rate in Nigeria is estimated at 0.65-0.95 kg/capita/day which gives an average of 42 million tonnes of wastes generated annually. This is more than half of 62 million tonnes of waste generated in sub-Sahara Africa annually and where and how to channel these wastes becomes a huge problem for the nation. This study examines the problems and prospects of solid waste management in some selected Nigerian cities using the mixed method of data collection. The findings revealed that waste management in Nigerian cities is largely monopolized by the agencies of state governments (sub-national governments) which have limited capacity to tackle the problems of solid waste management in their cities. In addition, 52 % of wastes generated are organic wastes which creates additional disposal problems. Although the problems of solid waste management in Nigeria range from poor collection and disposal methods; lack or poor waste management database; insufficient financial resources; non-compliance to laws and lack of awareness on dangers of poor sanitary habits, this paper argues that a robust waste data base, strict policies and regulation are important for effective solid waste management in Nigeria.

Keywords: Solid waste, Management, Cities, Nigeria, Government policies

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LATERITIC SOIL TREATED WITH POLYVINYL WASTE POWDER AS A POTENTIAL MATERIAL FOR LINERS AND COVER IN WASTE CONTAINMENT

Ugochukwu N. Okonkwo1, Emmanuel E. Arinze2, Emmanuel I. Ugwu3

Department of Civil Engineering, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture Umudike,
P.M.B 7267, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria

1ugochukwuokonkwo75@gmail.com
2emmanuel.arinze@mouau.edu.ng
3emmanuelugwu194@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT

Compacted lateritic soil treated with polyvinyl waste powder was considered for liners and cover in this study. The tests that were carried out on the polyvinyl waste powder and lateritic soil mixture were consistency limits, compaction test, unconfined compressive strength and hydraulic conductivity. The polyvinyl waste powder was added ranging from 4%, 8%, 12%, 16% and 20% all measured by weight of the dry soil. The specimens of the soil mixtures were prepared using two compactive energy levels namely the British Standard Light (BSL) and West African Standard (WAS) at moulding water contents of -2, 0, +2, +4% of optimum moisture content. The results showed that consistency limits, optimum moisture content reduced while the maximum dry density rose up with increase in polyvinyl waste powder. The strength characteristics improved up to 103% and 115% for British Standard Light and West African Standard respectively while hydraulic conductivity reduced to 10-9 cm/s and 10-10 cm/s for British Standard Light and West African Standard respectively with polyvinyl waste powder up to 20%. For liners and cover of sanitary landfill, 12% and 8% treatment of polyvinyl waste powder at optimum moisture content were found suitable for British Standard Light and West African Standard respectively.

Keywords: Polyvinyl Waste Powder, Lateritic Soil and Waste Containment

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STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC FACTORS RELATED TO WASTE DISPOSAL IN SOUTH-WESTERN, NIGERIA

Ilevbare Femi Monday*, (Ph.D.)

Population and Health Research Entity
North-West University
Mafikeng Campus
South Africa
femilevbare@oauife.edu.ng femilevbare@yahoo.co.uk
Phone: +27 782766476

 

Idemudia Erhabor Sunday

Population and Health Research Entity
North-West University
Mafikeng Campus
South Africa

ABSTRACT

In recent times, there has been a global concern in addressing household waste management practices by stakeholders due to its environmental implications. The present study examined antecedents of household waste disposal in selected urban settlements of South-Western, Nigeria. Primary data were used in the study. The study population comprised residents in Ile-Ife (a traditional semi-urban); Ibadan (an extrically mixed traditional urban) and Lagos (an extrically modern community) of South-Western, Nigeria. This study sample consisted of 1200 residents comprising 687 males and 513 females selected using a multi-stage sampling procedure. Their age ranged between 15 to 76 years with a mean age of 24.49 years (SD = 8.51). Data collection was through a self-reported questionnaire that measured socio-demographic factors and waste disposal behaviour. The results showed that residents from Ibadan Northwest LGA exhibited better attitude towards waste disposal (M= 54.80; SD = 8.34) than those residents in Lagos Mainland LGA (M =53.55; SD = 8.07) and Ife Central LGA (M=52.70; SD=7.73). The result showed also that there was no significant influence of gender on waste disposal behaviour (F = 0.028, p <.05). There was no significant influence of age on waste disposal behaviour (F (= 1.70, p >.05). The results also showed that there was no influence of education on waste disposal behaviour (F = 1.54, p >.05). The study highlights the need for some intervention in order to improve waste management practices among households through urban renewal.

Keywords: Gender, age, location, education, waste disposal behaviour, urban renewal

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Issue 1, February 2018

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE WASTE SLUDGE FROM PAINT BOOTH OF AUTOMOTIVE PARTS

Lucas Velloso Alves1, Lívia Nadur Novaes2, Regina Mambeli Barros3*, Gilbert Silva4,
Ivan Felipe Silva dos Santos5, Fernando das Graças Braga da Silva6

1Environmental Engineer, Federal University of Itajubá
2Master of Science in Materials Engineering, Hidraulic Engineer, Federal University of Itajubá
3Professor of Natural Resources Institute, Federal University of Itajubá, National Reference Center in Small Hydropower, (Instituto de Recursos Naturais da Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Centro Nacional de Referência em Pequenas Centrais Hidrelétricas), Av. BPS, 1303, Itajubá-MG, Brazil, 37500-903
4Professor of Mechanical Institute, Federal University of Itajubá
5Student of Master in Engineering of Energy, Hidraulic Engineer, Federal University of Itajubá
6Professor of Natural Resources Institute, Federal University of Itajubá

*Tel: +553536291224; Fax: +553536291265
remambeli@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

The waste sludge from paint booth of the automotive industry is a significant environmental liability due to its environmental impacts caused in the course of production and the solid waste generated during the application process. The present study seeks an adequate way to reuse waste paint sludge, based on the physical, chemical, morphological, and mineralogical characterization of three samples subjected to high temperatures: waste paint sludge composed by base and varnish (WPS), deactivated waste paint sludge (DWPS), and deactivated waste varnish sludge (DWVS). First, the samples were burned in an electric muffle furnace with staggered firing temperatures in order to verify loss of mass during the firing process. The physical, morphological, chemical, and mineralogical characterizations of the samples were performed using particle size analysis by Laser Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Diffraction. The firing process demonstrated a mass loss of over 90.0% of the samples, showing that there is no significant mass change over 600ºC. The experimental characterization showed occurrence of particles with diameters ranging from 1.156 – 837.1 µm, and heterogeneous agglomerates with irregular shape and sizes ranging from 2 – 300 µm. The elementary chemical composition of the samples demonstrated basically, the amounts of titanium, aluminium, silicon, and sodium; founded under cristaline phases of rutile, aluminium oxide, and quartz. The findings of this paper can be used in future studies aiming at the reuse of this waste for example into ceramic materials.

Keywords: Environmental liability; Solid waste characterization; Paint sludge

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SPENT SUBSTRATES FROM THREE SPECIES OF MUSHROOM AS ALTERNATIVE FEED RESOURCES FOR RUMINANT LIVESTOCK

I. Etela,1,2* A. Ogbeide2, A.I. Ukanwoko2, O.M. Adedokun3

1Institute of Agricultural Research and Development (IARD)
2Department of Animal Science
3Department of Crop and Soil Science, University of Port Harcourt, Choba, PMB 5323,
Port Harcourt, Nigeria

ibisime.etela@uniport.edu.ng; ibetela@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Three species of mushroom (Pleurotus tuber-regium; Volvariella volvaceae; Pleurotus ostreatus) were studied to determine their feed value using proximate composition, in vitro gas and methane production techniques. Dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), neutral detergent fibre (NDF), and crude protein (CP) contents differed (P < 0.05) amongst the three mushroom species while, acid detergent fibre (ADF) and ash contents were similar (P > 0.05). Pleurotus ostreatus on sawdust reached peak gas production (7.5 mL) at 15 hours after incubation while, peak gas production was recorded at 21 hours post-incubation for both V. volvacea on cotton (7.5 mL) and P. tuber-regium (5.5 mL). Significant differences (P < 0.05) were also observed for the effective gas production at the 4% and 5% rumen outflow rates. Pleurotus ostreatus on sawdust recorded the least (P < 0.05) methane gas production (2.0 mL) while, V. volvacea on cotton gave the highest (6.5 mL). The results indicate that, spent mushroom substrates (SMS) could be converted into economic benefit as meat for humans rather than being left as environmental nuisance. It was concluded that, P. ostreatus on sawdust produced the best utilized SMS in terms of digestibility and methane gas production.

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COMPARATIVE STUDY OF BIOGAS YIELD FROM PRE-TREATED RICE HUSK CO-DIGESTED WITH ANIMAL MANURES

Florence O. Ojoa, Gbolabo A. Ogunwandeb, Olusola O. Adesanwoc

aInstitute of Ecology and Environmental Studies
bDepartment of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering
cDepartment of Soil Science and Land Resources Management

Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Tel.: +234 803 4007128
gbolawande@gmail.com; gbolawande@oauife.edu.ng

ABSTRACT

Rice husk (RH), a readily available lignocellulosic waste was pre-treated by soaking and boiling in water before co-digestion with three animal manures (chicken, cow and swine) in a batch type anaerobic digester. Raw RH and no RH treatments were also set up. Results showed that manure type had significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on substrate temperature, pH, biological oxygen demand (BOD), total bacterial count and biogas yield (BY) while RH treatment method had on pH, BOD and biogas yield. Cow dung treatments had the highest BY due to the low RH content. Treatments with RH had low BYs due to the high acidic nature of the RH and low available biodegradable total carbon content. In addition, treatments with RH showed no significant (p > 0.05) difference in their yields. It is therefore concluded that co-digesting RH with animal manures using the pre-treatment methods adopted is not promising for biogas production.

Keywords: Anaerobic co-digestion, Rice husk, Animal manure, Pre-treatment method, Biogas yield

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EVALUATION OF EXISTING SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR SOLAN CITY–INDIA

Deepika Sharma, Rajiv Ganguly*

Department of Civil Engineering, Jaypee University of Information Technology,
Waknaghat, Solan, Himachal Pradesh 173234, INDIA

Tel: +91-1792-239412
rajiv.ganguly@juit.ac.in

ABSTRACT

Management of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is an essential function of the Urban Local Body (ULB) of the city or town. The paper presents an overview of the existing solid waste practices followed at Salogra dumpsite located in the district of Solan, Himachal Pradesh, India. Total Solid Waste generated in Himachal Pradesh (HP) is about 350 Tons per day (TPD) of which the daily average dumping at Salogra site in Solan city is about 22.5 tons per day. The per capita waste generation in Solan city is 0.4 kg/capita/day with a collection efficiency of about 60%. Of the total budgetary provisions for management of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated under the purview of Solan Municipal Corporation (MC), about 90% of them are utilized for collection and transportation purposes. The existing waste management practice at the study location was evaluated using the ‘wasteaware’ benchmark indicators which include qualitative and quantitative parameters for the assessment. In addition, a matrix method has been used for quantitative representation the results. The overall score achieved using the matrix method was only 32% indicating that there exists a significant scope for improvement in the management of the existing waste system practices in Solan. In this context, some suggestions have been proposed for improvement of the existing MSW management system in Solan.

Keywords: Municipal solid waste management, landfill, Public-private partnership, Wasteaware benchmark parameters

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MANAGING THE TECHNOLOGY FOR SELECTIVELY COLLECTING SOLID WASTE IN THE WESTERN AMAZON SUB REGION

Norma Maria Coelho Vieira*, Master’s Degree in Environmental Sciences from the University of Taubaté (UNITAU), Brazil. Voluntary member of the Research Group on Innovation Management and Technology (GEITEC) at the Federal University of Rondônia (UNIR), Brazil
coelho.norma@gmail.com

Marcelo José Peres Gomes da Silva, Specialist in Computer Networks and Data Communications at the State University of Londrina (UEL), Brazil

Flávio de São Pedro Filho, Doctor in Business Administration from USP. Professor of Management of UNIR. Coordinator GEITEC – Research Group Management of Innovation and Technology of the Federal University of Rondônia (UNIR), Brazil. Post-doctoral Candidate in Economics and Management, focusing on Strategy Management for Innovation and Sustainability, in the University of Beira Interior, Covilha, Portugal

Maria José Aguilar Madeira, Ph.D. in Management and Economics at the University of Beira Interior (UBI), Covilha, Portugal

Fabricio Moraes de Almeida, Doctor in Physics, Professor and Researcher for the Doctoral Course in Regional Development and Environment at the Federal University of Rondônia (UNIR), Brazil, Deputy Coordinator of GEITEC – Research Group on Management for Innovation and Technology, UNIR

ABSTRACT

This study‘s main objective is to study the complexity of technological management of the collection of solid waste, through the prism of reverse logistics; and to propose certain specific objectives: (1) to describe the form of concentration of solid waste in the group studied; (2) to analyze the impact of the volume of solid waste; and (3) to propose intervention measures for solid waste management. It asks what technology management model should guide the selective collection of solid waste in the Amazon. Based on the theory of convergence, it studies the strategy of competitive advantage in understanding the organizational system in the environment in which it operates; on this theory, Nobre (2011) addresses knowledge as a source that transmits competitive edge in order to contribute to a company’s organizational system. The research is qualitative and descriptive; it applies the Case Study method, and related procedures. As a study, it confirms that the investigated collector cooperatives are vulnerable, which influences the conclusions of this study. It finds that the collectors employed by these organizations are the significant environmental agents in the process of reusing and recycling materials and thus play a key role in reverse logistics because they can return the waste to the production chain adding value and promoting shared management,. The results also point to the absence of a system to promote environmental education, despite the potential viability of the materials and regardless of the possible economic and social improvements to the Amazonians and their families. The system proposed here involves the selective collection of solid waste by intelligent machines, applying reverse logistics. This study could benefit business people, the government and other stakeholders in public policy and sustainability in fragile environments such as the Brazilian Amazon.

Keywords: Amazon. Management. Innovation. Solid Waste. Technology

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SIMULATION OF HEAVY METALS MOVEMENT AND CHANGE IN CONCENTRATION IN SHALLOW UNCONFINED AQUIFER IN NORTH CENTRAL NIGERIA USING VISUAL MODFLOW AND MT3DMS

Peter Aderemi Adeoye*, Musa John Jiya and Abayomi Ibrahim Kuti

Department of Agricultural and Bioresources Engineering
Federal University of Technology
P.M.B.65, Minna Nigeria

peter.adeoye@futminna.edu.ng

ABSTRACT

Shallow groundwater is a major water source for rural people in Minna, a rapidly growing city in North-central Nigeria. However, indiscriminate dumping and poor poultry waste management in and around the city have threatened the quality of this water source. Visual MODFLOW was used to study the loading, dynamics fate and transport of some heavy metals in Minna shallow aquifer while MT3DMS was used to predict the concentration of the heavy metals in one, three and five years’ time. Conceptual model approach was employed for the simulation with the model domain discretized into 50cells each in x and y directions. Results showed that the whole aquifer was strongly contaminated with arsenic, copper and Zinc. This was presented as colour shading by visual MODFLOW. Initial concentrations of arsenic copper and zinc were 0.74mg/L, 8.43mg/L and 11.63mg/l respectively as against 0.01mg/l, 2.00mg/L and 5.00 mg/L recommended as maximum allowable contamination (MAC) for drinking water by WHO. MT3DMS predicted a progressive reduction in heavy metals concentration. For instance, a reduction in value to 0.60 mg/L, 7.51 mg/L and 4.20 mg/l were predicted for arsenic, zinc and copper respectively over five-years period. The study also revealed that the polluted shallow aquifer in Minna can be cleaned up of these heavy metals after some years.

Keywords: Contamination, prediction, shallow aquifer, heavy metals, concentration change and visual MODFLOW

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COMPARISON IN THE PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND
MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WASTE COAL COMBUSTION RESIDUES (CCR) GENERATED FROM FBC AND PCC BOILER USING THE SAME ORIGIN OF COAL

A.K. Mandal, O.P. Sinha

Department of Metallurgical Engineering
IIT(BHU), Varanasi, India
arup9180@yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT

In the present study comparison in the physicochemical and microstructural characterization of waste coal combustion residues (CCR) generated from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) as well as pulverized coal combustion (PCC) boiler was done. CCR were collected from two different types of the boiler having an almost same capacity as well as uses the same origin of coal for combustion. Due to lower temperature in FBC boiler, generated CCR are relatively denser in structure as comparison to CCR generated in PCC boiler. The generation of temperature is more than the ash melting temperature in PCC boiler which results the presence of alumina and silica in CCR as combined form of aluminosilicate. In FBC boiler, due to lower temperature, CCR have silica and alumina in free form. Oxides of both CCR like silica, alumina, and iron oxide are same but its percentage quantity is different in each CCR. Heavy metal content (like iron) is higher in bottom ash than fly ash in both PCC as well as FBC. At high temperature, ash got melted, and volatile material got entrapped to form cenosphere in PCC boiler which causes hollow cenosphere in major quantity. In FBC boiler, mainly solid structure of Fly Ash is observed due to absence of such phenomenon for lower temperature generation. Due to the presence of aluminosilicate in PCC Fly Ash, it can be used as a hard wear-resistant material. On the other hand, presence of free, uncombined alumina and silica in FBC Bottom Ash can facilitate for easy recovery of alumina, silica. Based on the different physicochemical properties it can be concluded that these wastes (CCR) should be exploited for preparing commercially viable products like bricks, tiles etc. apart from land filling. It will also control environmental problems by avoiding solid waste dumping.

Keywords: Coal Combustion Residues; FBC and PCC boilers; Fly Ash; Bottom Ash; Physicochemical characterization

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A PRELIMINARY COMPARISON OF MSW BIOREFINERY CONFIGURATIONS BASED ON PROCESS AND MATERIAL FLOWS, POWER PRODUCTION AND VALUE-ADDED PRODUCTS

Meckraz Chitamun, Ackmez Mudhoo*

Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering,
University of Mauritius, Reduit 80837, Mauritius

Phone: +2304037772, Fax: +2304657144
a.mudhoo@uom.ac.mu

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the potential of a biomass-based biorefinery in Mauritius using municipal solid wastes (MSW). Process selection and scenarios were worked out and the scenarios selected for the MSW biorefinery were anaerobic digestion (scenario A); material recovery facility system (scenario B); scenarios A and B (scenario C (a)); scenario C (a) with production of levulinic acid (scenario C (b)) and gasification (scenario D). The useful products from the MSW biorefinery were power, digested matter for composting, digestates for fertiliser, metals, glass and levulinic acid. The scenarios selected were analysed based on technical and economic parameters. For the technical analysis, 19.98 ton/h to 53.96 ton/h of MSW were processed in the MSW biorefinery. Ash produced varied from 0 to 3.76 ton/h. Carbon dioxide emissions were 2.83-26.97 tCO2e/h. The discounted payback period for the scenarios varied from 6.86-12.11 years, and the internal rate of return ranged from 15.47 to 24.56%. This study has shown that the best MSW biorefinery option is a combined process comprising anaerobic digestion, material recovery facility and the production of levulinic acid.

Keywords: Municipal solid wastes; biorefinery; sustainability; payback; emissions

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IMPROVEMENT OF EXPANSIVE SOIL PROPERTIES USING SAWDUST

Shulin Sun1, Bo Liu1, Tianyu Wang2

1College of Earth Sciences and Engineering, Hohai University, Nanjing 211100, China
2Jilin Electric Power Survey and Design Institute, Changchun 130000, China

 

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a study on using sawdust to improve properties of expansive soil. The swelling properties, unconfined compressive strength, shearing strength characteristics, and cyclic wetting-drying behavior of stabilized soil were studied. The optimum addition of sawdust was found to be 7.5%. The test results indicate that the swelling potential and swelling pressure decreases with the increased sawdust addition. The strength properties such as unconfined compressive strength, shearing strength, cohesion and friction angle increases with addition of sawdust up to an optimum value of about 7.5%, beyond which the strength properties begin to decrease. The unconfined compressive strength values increased with the increased curing period and the rate of strength gaining is initially higher and decreases after day 14. The cyclic wetting-drying tests show that the volume and cohesion of soil decrease with increased wetting-drying cycles while the friction angle values remained approximately constant. The addition of sawdust can effectively reduce the influence of drying and wetting cycles on the volumetric change and the shear strength parameters of soil.

Keywords: Sawdust; expansive soil; swelling properties; unconfined compressive strength; shearing strength; cyclic wetting-drying

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ANALYSIS OF HOUSEHOLD FOOD WASTE REDUCTION
TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE FOOD WASTE MANAGEMENT
IN MALAYSIA

Innocent A. Jereme1, Chamhuri Siwar1, Rawshan Ara Begum2,
Basri Abdul Talib3, Er Ah Choy1

1Institute for Environment and Development (LESTARI)
2Institute for Climate Change
3Faculty of Business and Economics

National University of Malaysia (UKM), Malaysia
Bangi 43600, Selangor D.E, Malaysia

ABSTRACT

Food wastes generations have continued to increase in recent years in Malaysia. According to the Ministry of Housing and Local Government (MHLG), food wastes have outstripped other solid wastes generated in Malaysia, constituting more than 40 percent of the total wastes disposed in 2010. From the MHLG data, food wastes disposed from households were more than other sources. Its existence in the wastes stream can always contaminate and complicate any effort to recover and recycle other dry wastes. Furthermore, the environmental impacts are enormous, including depletion of water sources, cause climate change, and affects human health when disposed at unsanitary landfills, and as well food security. Therefore, the study aims to investigate the current status of food wastes in Malaysia towards sustainable food waste management. Purposive non-random sampling method was applied to collect primary data through structured questionnaire from 333 respondents, 257 respondents were from Selangor, a developed state, and 76 from Terengganu, an underdeveloped state. To achieve the aims and objectives of this study, a statistical analysis with Structural Equation Model (SEM) was applied. Findings showed these variables: government policies on households’ food waste management, environmental knowledge, households’ environmental awareness, reducing food waste generation with food waste hierarchy have significant impacts towards reduction of food waste generation to achieving sustainable food waste management at households’ levels. The implication of the findings leads to the conclusion that sustainable food wastes management is not only about behavioural issues, but rather policies and regulations issues. It is suggested that government should have strong and important roles to play by formulating households’ food wastes policies, and provisions of infrastructural facilities that could lead to reducing food wastes at households, and at the same time creating awareness of the negative impacts of food wastes on the natural environment and to the economy as well. This could definitely lead to change of behaviours by households towards the issues of food wastes reduction.

Keywords: Sustainable food waste management, food waste generation, food waste, households and behaviour

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